Managing yourself creatively

The Pressures of Time

One of the most serious frustrations that plagues executives is the problem of finding time to do all the things they are supposed to do; keep abreast of their field; help form policy; attend meetings; issue instructions; check on subordinates; write reports, memos, and, of course, think. Unless the executive finds a satisfactory solution to this problem, he will feel harassed, overburdened, confused, perplexed – in a word, frustrated.

There is only one solution: organization of time, through planning. Long-range planning will set up a program of accomplishment for a thirty-day or even a sixty-day period; short-range planning sets up a weekly schedule; night-before planning pinpoints specific tasks to be done (or started) on the following day. Some concrete suggestions:

DISPOSE OF THE THINGS THAT CAN BE HANDLED PROMPTLY

The few projects that remain are not hard to cope with them, if the pile of work no longer looks like hopeless task to tackle.


TAKE TIME TO COMMUNICATE

A little time invested in explaining something a thoroughly to those who may be involved with you in a project can save endless hours later by preventing misunderstandings or fuzzy instructions.


DON’T BANG YOUR HEAD AGAINST A BRICK WALL

If a problem has you momentarily stymied, put it aside and come back to it when your mood and mind toward it have improved. Be careful, of course, not to postpone the task indefinitely.


EXAMINE MISCELLANEOUS DUTIES PERIODICALLY

You may find that some of them are merely habit and can no longer be defended as necessary. Habit and routine have an unbelievable power to waste your time and energy.





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